(510) 793-2404
Your Guide to Understanding Sports Hernias and the
 Medical Treatment of
 Sports Hernias
by William Brown, MD
Advanced Medical Treatment for Sports Related Hernias

Sports Hernia Prevention

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How to Prevent an Inguinal Hernia

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

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While Dr. William Brown can repair hernias, he’d prefer people do what they can to prevent them. Often, unless you’re avoiding a hernia from recurring, you don’t think much about what you can do to prevent an inguinal hernia. Luckily, much of the advice is common sense and easy to follow. Chances are that you’re already doing much of what you can.

Don’t smoke
This isn’t the 1950s anymore. We know smoking causes death from serious problems with your cardiac and respiratory systems. But smoking also attacks collagen, making you look older than you really are and weakens your muscles that depend on collagen to remain strong. Weak collagen leaves you vulnerable to an inguinal hernia because your muscles tear more easily if you’re a smoker.

Don’t ignore…

Prevent a Sports Hernia

Best Stretches for Sports Hernia Prevention

What exactly is a sports hernia? It’s a difficult-to-diagnose injury that is caused by repetitive movements that many sports—such as tennis, running, basketball, dancing, wrestling, football, hockey, and soccer—involve.

Not only can a sports hernia develop from repetitive movement; it can also happen as a result of a sudden twisting motion. When a sports hernia occurs, it can cause truly debilitating pain that remains persistent and can threaten the performance of many athletes. Because these injuries are severe and have the potential to hurt an otherwise great sports career, it’s very important for athletes to do their best to prevent sports hernias from happening.

What’s one of the best ways to prevent a sports hernia?

Stretching! Do this before engaging in any type of sport—or any strenuous activity, for that matter. When you stretch, you’re helping your muscles become more flexible and therefore less…

Age Discrimination and Sports Hernias

Sports Hernias Past 50

Although Sports Hernias are mostly associated with athletes in their prime (ages 24-40), this painful condition can occur in teenagers and those over the age of 50. Theses injuries do not discriminate based on age.

While the main cause of developing a Sports Hernia is repetitive, rapid changes in direction while playing sports, age can assist in causing the issue as well. Why? Because a Sports Hernia tends to develop when a weak spot in a muscle gets stressed and rips. This damage creates pain and weakness.   A Sports Hernia feels like a sharp pain in the lower abdomen, groin, thigh or testicles (in men). This pain gets worse when playing sports, exerting energy or exercising, and can also be felt while lifting or during a cough, laugh or sneeze.

The beginning symptoms of a Sports Hernia will often start with pain in the lower groin…

Summertime Safety

Warming Up to Warm Weather Sports Without Injury

It’s heating up all over the country, and for many, that means taking up summer sports again. With these warm seasons come tennis, running, basketball, and soccer, among others. Warmer weather also brings more activity for weekend warriors who love to spend their spare time being active.

Because so many are getting back into their sports habits, it’s a good time of year to be very aware of recognizing the signs of a sports hernia. A sports hernia can be a “hidden” injury since it’s not noticeable by the eye—only by the pain it causes. (Regular hernias can be detected by a bulge under the skin, but sports hernias do not have a bulge.)

Sports hernias develop due to the repetitive, quick movements that many sports require, as well as athletic twisting and turning while playing. And summertime is a good…

Need a New Resolution Already?

How About Lowering Your Risk for Sports Hernia Injuries?

Resolutions often focus on being healthier, both physically and emotionally. Get fit. Eat better. Spend more time with family. Drink more water. New Year’s resolutions always seem to follow the same pattern. Change your habits, and you will change your life.

But when we flip the calendar to February, those vague goals are replaced by former bad habits and dealing with everyday life. So this year, consider making a different type of resolution, one that is short and simple, but will have a significant impact on your life. This year, resolve to reduce your risk of a sports hernia injury. Not an athlete? That doesn’t matter.

Anyone can sustain a sports hernia, from professional athletes to Netflix bingers. A sports hernia is one common injury that spans all ages and activities. One occurs when the groin muscles tear. Muscles can tear…

Interval Training & Sports Hernias

Minimize the Risk of a Sports Hernia Associated with Interval Training

It seems like every month, there’s a new fitness craze sweeping the nation. Some stick around, like Pilates and hot yoga, but others don’t quite make it (like the Shake Weight). A more recent trend that seems like it might be here to stay is interval training. It combines high-intensity exercises like box jumps and running ladders into a circuit. You do a few sets or minutes of each and move on to the next activity. The goal is to keep your heart rate up and vary the exercises. So far, it seems beneficial, and more and more people are trying it. However, what’s less clear is the less beneficial side: the risk of a sports hernia injury.

The basis of interval training is its speed. Athletes move from one activity to the next, limiting breaks and recovery time…

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William Brown, MD
Sports Hernia Specialist

Dr. Brown has been performing sports hernia surgeries and providing specialized rehabilitation programs since 1999.

His clients include the San Jose Sharks, San Jose Sabercats and the San Jose Earthquakes sports teams as well as athletes from the NFL, AFL, NBA, NBL and the United States Soccer League. Athletes from all over the United States as well as from 15 foreign countries have sought out Dr. Brown's expertise.

Locations: (Fremont is the Main Office)

Fremont Office:
39470 Paseo Padre Pkwy
Fremont, CA 94538
Phone: (510) 793-2404
Fax: (510) 793-1320

Monterey Office:
1011 Cass Street, Suite 115
Monterey, CA 93940

Palo Alto Office:
151 Forest Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94301

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